Skip to Main Content

I did not Plagiarize! Think Again: Plagiarism

This module will help students understand and identify various kinds of plagiarism and how to avoid commiting it.

According to NU Student Code of Conduct, plagiarism is “intentionally or carelessly presenting the work of another as one’s own. It includes submitting an assignment purporting to be the student’s original work which has wholly or in part been created by another person. It also includes the presentation of the work, ideas, representations, or words of another person without customary and proper acknowledgment of sources.”

Plagiarism occurs when a person:

  1. directly copies one or more sentences of another person’s written work without proper citation, including cutting and pasting material obtained from the Internet or other electronic sources;
  2. changes words but copies the sentence structure of a source without giving credit to the original source, or closely paraphrases one or more paragraphs without acknowledgment of the source of the ideas, or uses graphs, figures, drawings, charts or other visual/audio materials without acknowledging the source or the permission of the author;
  3. submits false or altered information in any academic exercise, including making up data for an experiment, altering data, citing nonexistent articles, contriving sources, etc.;
  4. turns in all or part of the assignment done by another student and claims it as their own;
  5. uses a paper writing service, has another student write a paper, or uses a foreign language translation and submits it as their own original work;
  6. in computer programming class, uses computer code written by another student.

A plagiarism prevention tool company has identified various types of plagiarism based on instructor insights (Turnitin, 2012). The plagiarism spectrum consists of ten types of plagiarism and it will be discussed in detail below. Read and reflect on these and you may be responsible for committing any of them. 


Reference: Turnitin. (2012). The plagiarism spectrum: tagging 10 types of unoriginal work. http://turnitin.com/

Forms of Plagiarism

Example of a Plagiarized Content

Original

What could have been done

Verbatim (word-for-word) quotation without clear acknowledgment

All disciplines offer unique but limited perspectives onto the social reality they study.

All disciplines offer unique but limited perspectives onto the social reality they study.

(Taken from Essentials of Transdisciplinary Research by Leavy, p. 15)

Paraphrase the statement:

Each field of study has its own unique yet partial way of seeing the social reality

Cutting and pasting from the Internet without clear acknowledgement

Copied verbatim: Under the guidance of Mr. Shigeo Katsu, since December 2010, Nazarbayev University had achieved great success in various spheres. 

Under the guidance of Mr. Shigeo Katsu, since December 2010, Nazarbayev University had achieved great success in various spheres. 

Cite the source:

Nazarbayev University. (2018). The State medal awarded to the President of Nazarbayev University. Retrieved from https://nu.edu.kz/news/state-medal-awarded-president-nazarbayev-university

Or paraphrase and cite:

The Nazarbayev University reached a great milestone since the start of the presidency of Mr. Shigeo Katsu in December 2010.

Nazarbayev University. (2018). The State medal awarded to the President of Nazarbayev University. Retrieved from https://nu.edu.kz/news/state-medal-awarded-president-nazarbayev-university

Collusion
 

You and your friend decided to work together. Both of you will divide the tasks and you will combine later on but you submitted almost the same work.

You have an essay assignment. You are required to submit the essay individually.

Just work independently

Inaccurate and improper citation

YOON-JOO, L. (2017). How Do Self-Values Play a Role In Consumers' Perception of CSR Advertising? The Moderated Mediation Effect of Self-Referencing. Journal Of Advertising Research

Yoon-Joo, L. (2017). How Do Self-Values Play a Role In Consumers' Perception of CSR Advertising? The Moderated Mediation Effect of Self-Referencing. Journal Of Advertising Research, 57(4), 422-435. doi:10.2501/JAR-2017-050

Verify references

Failure to acknowledge assistance

When authors forgot to mention the interviewees

“The authors wish to thank the following people for providing the information the authors need to

accomplish this paper”

Document all the people who was involved in research

Self-plagiarism

Using some of the paragraphs you wrote from a former class.  This recycling of one’s own work is considered self-plagiarism. https://www.utdallas.edu/library/plagiarism/plagiarismexamples.html

Original work.

Avoid duplication of your own work because same results will be shared and that will lower the value of the study

 

Source: University of Oxford. (2018). Plagiarism. https://www.ox.ac.uk

Avoiding plagiarism requires good writing skills. Here you will find some writing tips below to help you get started on the right track.

  1. Learn the principles of good writing so you have the necessary skills to express your ideas in your own words. Poor writing skills often result in unintentional plagiarism.
  2. Learn how to paraphrase a source with your own words. After you have finished reading something, set it aside, write it in your own words, compare it with what you read earlier in the source document, and refine your writing. Make sure to cite the source document.
  3. Learn how to cite sources properly. Choose a citation style (such as APA, MLA, or other as required) suitable for your discipline and familiarise yourself with it fully. You may also find examples of citation styles in journals specific to your discipline.
  4. Learn what plagiarism is and what it is not. Learn how to detect it. After paraphrasing a source, identify words or phrases in what you have written that appear to be similar to those in the source. You can highlight such words or phrases in your own writing and decide if they should be within quotes or should be expressed differently with your own words.
  5. Don't assume what you know is "common knowledge" for everyone—it may not be. You may need to cite some things you think are "common knowledge."
  6. Don't misinterpret or manipulate what was intended in a source to suit your needs. This applies not only to text but also to charts, graphs, images, music, and video.
  7. When using citations gleaned from secondary sources, make sure those citations actually exist and find out what was really conveyed in those cited sources so that you are not reproducing someone else's misinterpretation.
  8. Obtain permission from authors when using large portions of their text and give them due credit in your writing.
  9. Make use of the help available from the Library, the Writing Center at the university, online resources, and, of course, your course instructor.
  10. When in doubt, put the text within quotes and include citations.

From: The Academic Integrity Tutorial for Students, by the Northern Illinois University, licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Books in the Library

reference
referencing
plagiarism
Library Homepage Facebook Youtube Instagram Twitter Telegram E-mail